How to Become a Sober Companion

How to Become a Sober Companion

Sober companions are probably best known by their work with celebrities as almost “glorified babysitters” but of course there is much more to it than that. Also, not all sober companions are watch dogs for celebrities. Sober companions work with slews of addicts and alcoholics sometimes 24 hours a day, 7 days a week to help them remain abstinent.

What is a sober companion?

A sober companion or sober coach provides one-on-one assistance to newly recovering drug addicts and alcoholics. The goal is to help the client maintain total abstinence from alcohol and drugs, and to establish healthy routines outside of a residential treatment facility. Controversy exists between sober companions, not only in their name (sober companion vs. sober coach vs. recovery coach), but over the use of any situation placing them in contact with other enablers. Also, some sober companions strongly agree with 12 step programs; other sober companions do not support the 12 step process and use alternative methods.

So how can you become a sober companion if you want to be one?

In keeping with several other forms of drug rehabilitation, some sober companions have no formal training or qualification. Most (but not all) companions are recovering addicts who have themselves been able to maintain multiple years of sobriety. While some companions will have some training in psychology, sociology, or medicine, in addition to a strong personal program of recovery, some may have taken the Recovery Coaching certifications offered by Recovery Coaching International (recoverycoaches.org) or the very inexpensive (sometimes free) training offered by the Connecticut Center for Addiction Recovery (CCAR.org) training in a model for peer recovery support specialist roles and responsibilities. A few independent providers, such as Sober Champion require literature study and in-person training by an experienced professional.

There are growing recovery associations (Sober.com, crossroadscoaching.com, RCI.org, ICF.org, OASAS.org) and boards established to set standards or monitor the state of the field recovery coaching, that overlap some of the roles of a sober companion. There is no formal sober companion oversight and accountability as yet. Since early in 2011, Faces and Voices in Recovery has been working on developing standards, credentialing and more clearly defined roles of a recovery coach, peer support specialist, and a sober companion. One can see why there is a concern according to the California Association of Alcoholism and Drug Abuse Counselors, as it is a process that is just underway.

The Sociotherapy Association certifies and trains Support Companions, Recovery/Sober Companions, Elderly Companions, and Adolescent Companions. The Sociotherapy Association in America created the Support Companions program to offer real support and relationship to those in need.

If you really want to be a sober companion the best place to start is with someone who already is. So go out and find people who are already doing what you want to do. If you can’t find anyone who is a sober companion go ahead and get on your computer. You can be sure to find ways to become a sober companion online.

What is a Sober Companion?

What is a Sober Companion?

What is a Sober Companion, Sober Coach, or Recovery Coach?

A sober companion, sober coach, or recovery coach provides one-on-one assistance to newly recovering drug addicts and alcoholics. The goal is to help the client maintain total abstinence from alcohol and drugs, and to establish healthy routines outside of a residential treatment facility. Sober coaches assist with the transition from treatment back to everyday living. The sober coach will meet the client at discharge, accompany them on their trip home, and within 24 hours, attend with them their first AA or NA meeting.

What are the Duties of a Sober Companion?

The sober companion’s duties encompass a wide variety, from ensuring that the client remains abstinent to serving as a resource broker and advocate in the client’s home community.

The primary duty of a sober companion is to ensure the recovering addict does not relapse. They may be hired to provide round the clock care, be on-call, or to accompany the recovering addict during particular activities, such as taking them to fellowship meetings at which the recovery coach encourages them to meet people and get phone numbers. They work together with the client in making their home a clean and sober environment, as well support the client in following through with their recommended discharge plan.

A sober companion also acts as an advocate for the newly recovering person and provides new ways for the client to act in their own living environment. Many companions use techniques such as chiropractic adjustments, acupuncture, meditation, distraction, massage, diet and proper nutrition, exercise and even prayer and affirmation of sober choices. A sober coach either completely removes the addict from his own environment of hidden stashes, or may search for hidden drugs in their own environment, in an effort to make the living environment safe for the client and to prevent them from relapsing

How Long Does Sober Companion Services Last?

Companions are available to assist clients for as long as support is deemed necessary. Sober companion treatment usually lasts for 30 days however, oftentimes, much longer. The time required to effect a meaningful change varies greatly depending upon the client, their co-occurring disorders, and the family life at home. Ideally, a companion’s presence in the client’s life will decrease as the client’s ability to confront family, work, and legal issues without relapse is proven. Some providers stay with their clients for many months, and some offer only transportation services.

The Benefits of Having a Sober Companion

The first few days outside of the structured treatment setting are typically the most critical – and most trying for the newly recovering alcoholic/addict. This transitional period is often awkward and uncomfortable for the recovering person therefore, sober companionship and coaching offers support, encouragement, and camaraderie during this crucial time.

Other circumstances for which having a sober coach is beneficial are cases where an actor or musician will not attend treatment, but must remain abstinent to complete a film or recording project. Another circumstance might be that the newly recovering alcoholic/addict is in school and thus needs to be back in their own living environment.

 

 

 

 

Sources:

http://en.wikipedia.org

http://www.soberescorts.com/

 

 

How Can I Become a Recovery Coach?

How Can I Become a Recovery Coach?

 

What is recovery coaching?

Recovery coaching is a form of strengths-based support for anyone who has an addiction or is in recovery from alcohol, other drugs, codependency, or other addictive behaviors. Recovery coaches work with anyone who has active addictions as well as people who are already in recovery. Recovery coaches are helpful for making decisions about what to do with your life and the part your addiction or recovery plays within your life. Recovery coaches usually try to help clients find ways to stop addiction by maintaining abstinence, or reduce harm associated with addictive behaviors. Recovery coaches can help a client find resources for harm reduction, detox, treatment, family support and education, local or online support groups; or help a client create a change plan to recover on their own as well as make goals and plans to achieve those goals.

How can I become a recovery coach?

There are multiple programs that offer recovery coach training such as the recovery coach institute or RCI. RCI has a website that you can utilize regardless if you already have recovery coach training or have no experience at all. RCI supports Recovery Coach training programs that are approved by the International Coach Federation (ICF). Basic coach training is available through any of the ICF schools listed on the International Coaching Federation (ICF) website. www.recoverycoaching.org

If you:

•are a certified coach, you can get Recovery Coaching training through a specialized Recovery Coaching school.

•have no coach training, you can get it through any of the ICF schools listed on the ICF website.

•are a chemical dependency professional, you can take advanced training to learn about coaching so you can integrate a coaching style into your current work. Or you can become a certified coach by training at an ICF-approved school. A list of approved training programs is available on the ICF website.

•are a psychotherapist specializing in addiction recovery, you can consider basic coach training through an ICF-approved program.

Many treatment centers also offer Recovery Coach Academies or RCA.  A general overview of a recovery coach academy looks something like this:

Recovery Coach Academy is designed to help individuals, professional and non-professional, working in the Human Service Field. A Recovery Coach is anyone interested in promoting recovery by:

• Removing barriers and obstacles to recovery by serving as a personal guide

• Education

• Motivational Interviewing

• Personal Boundaries

• Ethics and Case Management

Recovery coach training also involves:

Training Objectives

• A guide and ethical standard for non-professionals and case managers

• A training guide for professionals to teach volunteer staff

• Motivational and Interviewing skills

• Defining the Recovery Coach role

If you search for recovery coach training or utilize the ICF or RCI websites you can find multiple ways to become a recovery coach wherever you are located. Each state has different resources as well as different institutes, academies, and training programs for you to become a recovery coach. If you feel like recovery coaching might be for you then go ahead and see what your state has to offer. While you don’t need recovery coaching certification to become a recovery coach it can definitely help in all facets of your addiction and recovery career.

 

 

 

Difference between a Recovery Coach and a Life Coach

Difference between a Recovery Coach and a Life Coach

Difference between a Recovery Coach and a Life Coach

Most people think that recovery coaching and life coaching are the same thing. While it’s true that there is a lot of overlap between the two fields, they are not the same thing. But before we examine the difference between a recovery coach and a life coach, let’s look at how they are the same.

Recovery Coach and Life Coach: Similarities

  • Life coaching and recovery coaching both help people identify and achieve personal goals.
  • Life coaches and recovery coaches are not 12-step sponsors
  • Life coaching and recovery coaching work off a partnership model wherein the client is considered to be the expert on his or her life, the one who decides what is worth doing, and the coach provides expertise in supporting successful change.
  • Life coaches and recovery coaches are not therapists, and sessions are not meant to replace traditional therapy.
  • Life coaching and recovery coaching teach to thrive in recovery, not merely survive.
  • Life coaches and recovery coaches help you build a successful future.
  • Life coaches and recovery coaches are holistic guides: they help you grow mind, body and spirit.
  • Life coaches and recovery coaches support and guide you.

Recovery Coach and Life Coach: Difference

The main difference between a recovery coach and a life coach is that you don’t have to be in recovery to use a life coach. If you are in recovery, a life coach can help you towards your recovery goals as well as your other life goals.  However, people who are not in recovery use life coaches too.

Recovery coaching is specifically designed for people in recovery. To this end, recovery coaches may have a better idea of the specific challenges that relate to recovery from drugs and alcohol. This is not always the case, and many times life coaches have a lot of experience working with people in recovery, but this is one of the main differences between a recovery coach and a life coach.

Another difference between a recovery coach and a life coach is that a recovery coach focuses on your recovery goals as well as your life goals. They understand that you need a solid recovery before you can focus on other things in your life like school, career, and relationships. They also understand that to have a sustainable recovery, you must develop personal goals and make plans to attain them.

In addiction, we are often very destructive. Many of us come into treatment with our lives in shambles. We destroy relationships, finances, and career prospects. Those of us who suffer from the disease of alcoholism and addiction tend to be extraordinarily bad at managing our own lives. Unfortunately, this does not magically resolve itself when the drugs and alcohol are removed from the equation. Many of us still need extra support and guidance when it comes to rebuilding our lives and making plans for a happy, healthy and productive future. This is where life coaches and recovery coaches can help.

Recovery Coaching Training

What is recovery coaching?

Recovery Coaching is a professional relationship that helps people who are in or want recovery from alcoholism and addiction. Recovery coaching helps to produce results in addict’s and alcoholic’s lives, jobs, careers, organizations, businesses, etc. while also helping them to move forward with their recovery.

Recovery coaches tap into the innate health and wellness of each individual. They are different than sponsors and therapists because they don’t promote any particular way of getting and achieving sobriety. The focus of recovery coaches is to create and sustain meaningful lives for addicts and alcoholics.

Recovery Coaches are professionals who have been trained to listen, observe and customize their approach to the individual needs of their clients. They are trained to help clients resolve ambivalence, increase confidence and motivation, and use a strengths-based approach to addiction recovery.

So how do I become a recovery coach?

Recovery coaching training is for those individuals who want to be coaches. There are places to find recovery coaching training all over the world. Some places offer recovery coach academies.

For instance, the CCAR or Connecticut Community for Addiction Recovery offers a five day training opportunity and has trained more than 2,100 recovery coaches nationwide. http://www.ccar.us/

The CCAR model is used by most recovery coach academies across the United States and attending an RCA or recovery coach academy that follows this model is how you become a recovery coach. So by looking at the CCAR model you can get an idea of how you can become a recovery coach.

The training at CCAR provides participants a comprehensive overview of the purpose and task of a recovery coach and explains the various roles played by a recovery coach. The training which is the model for most recovery coach academies provides individuals with tools and resources useful in providing recovery support services and puts emphasis on the skills needed to link people in recovery to needed supports within the community that promote recovery.

Professional recovery coaches are trained in both coaching core competency and in addiction best practices such as stages of change, motivational interviewing, as well as harm reduction and more.

A reputable recovery coach academy in Florida offered by Palm Partners Treatment Center is a great way to get started with recovery coaching. This recovery coach academy also follows the CCAR model and is over a two week period that consists of 6 days of classes. http://www.palmpartners.com/training/recovery-coach-academy/  

If you are in the state of Florida and want to become a recovery coach look into this RCA.

Through a recovery coach academy you can become a certified recovery coach and begin helping those who want to improve their life and move forward with their sobriety.