Advice for people with less than 30 days in Recovery

First 30 days of recovery

Advice for people with less than 30 days in Recovery

There’s a reason that most drug rehabs will recommend you stay in treatment for at least 30 days, and why 12 step programs tell you to go to 90 meetings in your first 90 days of recovery. The first few months after quitting drugs and alcohol are often the hardest. During this time, addicts and alcoholics are at the highest risk of relapse. Here is some advice for people with less than 30 days in recovery:

Advice for people with less than 30 days in Recovery: Take care of yourself

One of the biggest reasons for relapse for people with less than 30 days in recovery is that they do not feel well. When your body is not physically fit, it can drain you psychologically and emotionally. Take care of yourself in the first couple months: eat good food, get plenty of rest, and exercise. Make sure you are washing your hands often to protect yourself from other people’s germs. Don’t let yourself get too hungry or tired. Make your health your top priority. If you do get sick, take it easy. Realize that a lot of what you are feeling is due to a temporary illness and that you will feel better soon.

Advice for people with less than 30 days in Recovery: Go to meetings

Meetings are very important for people with less than 30 days in recovery. They allow you to build a support system, be accountable, and talk to other people in recovery. It also occupies your time. Having too much free time in early recovery can be a recipe for disaster. Boredom can very quickly lead to thoughts of using. Get a home group and a sponsor as soon as possible. Volunteer for a service commitment like making coffee or greeting people. Service is one of the best ways to meet new people and strengthen sobriety through helping others.

Advice for people with less than 30 days in Recovery: Tell on yourself

It is very common for people with less than 30 days in recovery to have thoughts of using. The best way to combat these thoughts before they turn into actions is to get in the habit of telling on yourself. As soon as you have these thoughts, call someone and tell them. Or raise your hand at a meeting and share. Not only will you open yourself up to people that can help, by just saying these things out loud, you can often stop the thoughts of using from consuming you. This can also work for any behaviors that you know are detrimental. When you lie, ‘fess up immediately. If you are having thoughts about breaking rules or doing other things that aren’t right, just tell someone. Remember, your addiction wants you to keep quiet. It wants you to justify your negative behavior. It wants you to isolate yourself from your support system. Do not let it. Do not trust your thoughts in early sobriety. Always talk to someone about how you are feeling and get input before every decision. If you are hesitating about talking to someone else about something you’re doing or planning to do, that should be an indication that it is not the right thing.